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Arizona

6 Cool Facts About Lyman Lake State Park

Cheyenne Reed

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Lyman Lake is a beautiful lake in Northern Arizona between St. Johns and Eagar, Arizona. This lake is the perfect place for a relaxing weekend getaway.

1) Lyman Lake State Park encompasses 1,200 acres!

Lyman Lake in Northern Arizona.
Flickr User Alan Richardson
Flickr User Alan Richardson

The elevation is about 6, 000 feet. Being this far up keeps out a lot of pollution making the air absolutely fresh.

2) The park Hugs the Shore of a 1,500 Acre Reservoir

Flickr User Matt Peeples
Flickr User Matt Peeples

The reservoir was created by blocking off the Little Colorado River. Melting snow from Mount Baldy and Escudilla Mountain — the second and third highest mountains in Arizona! — feeds into the reservoir.

3) The Park Doesn’t Rent Boats, But You Can Bring Your Own!

Flickr User Alan Richardson
Flickr User Alan Richardson

Because the lake is so big, they’re able to accommodate boats of all sizes. This is one of the few places in Northeastern Arizona with no size restrictions! Speedboats, water skis, you name it!

4) But Don’t Despair if Fishing is More Your Speed

arizonaexperience.org
arizonaexperience.org

Thankfully, the west end of the lake has been restricted as a no-wake zone for those in search of calmer waters to fish in. You’ll generally find a variety of fish there, including Walleye, channel catfish, and largemouth bass.

5) Summer Days at Lyman Lake are Perfection

Flickr User Matt Peeples
Flickr User Matt Peeples

With brilliant sun shining down on the lake, and highs in the 80’s and lower 90’s, what more is there to ask for?

6) Lyman Lake is Rich With Archaeological History

Petroglyphs near Lyman Lake.
Flickr User Don Barrett
Flickr User Don Barrett

At Rattlesnake Point, you can see the Petroglyph Trail. The prehistoric inhabitants left many buildings, artifacts, and petroglyphs that help us learn about the people and the area’s past. Scientists study in this area to learn about past human behavior. The Hopi people also value the remnants of this area as a way of better understanding their cultural traditions.

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