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New Mexico

There’s Something Magical About Bottomless Lakes in New Mexico

John Ghost

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The world over knows the name of Roswell, New Mexico. The first thought that most likely comes to mind is of alien spacecraft landings and government cover-ups. Roswell has been short-changed due to its media abused and conspiracy-based image. It actually has one of the most unique thriving fine art scenes in the country and some of the most magical lakes on the planet. If there’s anything truly astounding happening in Roswell, New Mexico, it’s one of these two aspects. So, focusing on the latter, let’s put alien conspiracies aside and revel in the glorious Roswell lakes in the Bottomless Lakes State Park!

1. Lazy Lagoon

Lazy Lagoon in Roswell, New Mexico - Photo by slicedgeek
The Lazy Lagoon in Roswell, New Mexico – Photo by slicedgeek

Lazy Lagoon is one of the two deepest lakes in the Bottomless Lake State Park. It’s depths go down to 90 feet with the largest surface area of 26,1 acres.

2. Cottonwood Lake

Cottonwood Lake in Roswell New Mexico - Photo by Timothy Turner
Cottonwood Lake in Roswell New Mexico – Photo by Timothy Turner

The small Cottonwood Lake is a lot shallower than the Lazy Lagoon with a depth of 27.5 feet. But it does have more natural shade on those sunny days covering only .52 acres of land.

3. Mirror Lake North

Mirror Lake North in Roswell, New Mexico - Photo by Timothy Turner
The Mirror Lake North in Roswell, New Mexico – Photo by Timothy Turner

Mirror Lake North has a depth of 32.8 feet and has a land area of 3 acres.

4. Mirror Lake South

Mirror Lake South in Roswell, New Mexico - Photo by MT Hallock Morris
The Mirror Lake South in Roswell, New Mexico – Photo by MT Hallock Morris

Mirror Lake South is actually a bit deeper than its northern sister with a depth of 43.3 feet but with a much smaller land area of only 0.44 acres.

Mirror Lake South to North - Photo courtesy of http://www.americansouthwest.net
Mirror Lake South to North – Photo courtesy of http://www.americansouthwest.net

5. Devil’s Inkwell

Devil's Inkwell in Roswell, New Mexico - Photo by Richard Thelen
Devil’s Inkwell in Roswell, New Mexico – Photo by Richard Thelen

The Devil’s Inkwell may have a sinister name but it’s not too scary. It has the darkest algae which make it appear darker than the other lakes. The Devil’s Inkwell has a maximum depth of 28.2 feet and a small land area of just only 0.36 acres.

6 and 7. Figure Eight Lake North and South

Figure Eight Lake North and South in Roswell, New Mexico – Photo by Jack Dickson

By the title, you might have guessed the shape of these two lakes. They form a figure eight, but don’t be fooled, they are actually two different lakes. The Figure Eight North has a maximum depth of 37 feet and a land area of 1.46 acres. While the Figure Eight South has a maximum depth of 22 feet and a land area of 0.76 acres.

8. Pasture Lake

Pasture Lake in Roswell, New Mexico - Photo by Dave and Diane
Pasture Lake in Roswell, New Mexico – Photo by Dave and Diane

Little Pasture Lake is the shallowest of all the lakes in the Bottomless Lakes State Park with only a maximum depth of 18 feet and a land area of 0.76 acres. This petite lake in comparison with its sisters still has a lot of beauty to offer.

9. Lost Lake

Lost Lake in Roswell, New Mexico - Photo by Dave and Diane
Lost Lake in Roswell, New Mexico – Photo by Dave and Diane

The mysterious Lost Lake has an unknown depth and covers an incredibly small land area of just 0.1 acres. What’s in this lake? I dare you to find out!

10. Lea Lake

Lea Lake in Roswell, New Mexico - Photo by Joel Deluxe
Lea Lake in Roswell, New Mexico – Photo by Joel Deluxe

The beautiful Lea Lake is one of the deeper ones with a maximum depth of 90 feet. It’s also the second-largest with regards to land acreage, which is 15 acres. Lea Lake is the only lake that allows swimming and has a daily spring flow of about 2,500,000 US gallons.

11. Dimmit Lake

The private-owned Dimmit Lake in Roswell, New Mexico – Photo courtesy of Wikipedia

Dimmit Lake is privately owned, which has made it impossible for me to find a good image of it, unfortunately. The maximum depth is unknown, however, and it is made up of two basins covering about 10 acres.

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